Fish

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Safe
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Unsafe
Safe

Bass

Moderate levels of mercury have been detected in this fish. Avoid where possible but it should be fine in very limited quantities.
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Careful

Bluefish

There are moderate levels of mercury in this fish, and you should avoid if possible. It should be fine in very limited quantities.
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Careful

Bombay Duck

Unsafe levels of mercury have reportedly been found in Bombay Duck found off the shore of India. Be sure to double check the source.
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Careful
Safe
Safe

Carp

Carp can contain moderate levels of mercury, and should only be eaten in strictly limited quantities.
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Careful
Safe

Caviar (Sturgeon Roe)

Be sure it is pasteurised or else there is a danger of contracting listeria.
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Careful

Cockle

Only if it is thoroughly cooked, melting and slightly burnt.

Raw shellfish isn't safe for pregnant women.
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Safe

Cod

Cod is considered very safe to eat during pregnancy.
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Safe

Coley

One of the safest fish to consume during pregnancy.
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Safe

Crab

Only if it is thoroughly cooked, melting and slightly burnt.

Raw shellfish is considered unsafe for pregnant women.
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Safe
Safe

Crayfish

Only if it is thoroughly cooked, melting and slightly burnt.

Make sure you cook this thoroughly - raw shellfish is unsafe if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.
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Safe

Cuttlefish

Only if it is thoroughly cooked, melting and slightly burnt.

Eating raw shellfish can be harmful during pregnancy.
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Safe

Dogfish (Rock Salmon)

Don't consume this fish more than twice a week. It can contain harmful levels of pollutants.
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Careful
Safe

Dungeness Crab

Only if it is thoroughly cooked, melting and slightly burnt.

Make sure you cook this well as raw shellfish can be harmful during pregnancy.
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Safe

Eel

Safe
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Unsafe
Safe

Flounder

Flounders are considered especially safe to consume and needn't be limited during pregnancy.
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Safe

Gravlax (Gravadlax)

This dish, prepared with raw and unfrozen fish, can be contaminated with harmful bacteria so is best to avoid.
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Unsafe
Safe

Gurnard

Regarded as very safe during pregnancy.
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Safe

Haddock

Haddock is one of the safest fish to consume during pregnancy.
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Safe

Hake

Eating Hake is perfectly safe during pregnancy.
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Safe

Halibut

While Halibut is safe, it is not recommended to consume more than two servings a week while pregnant or breastfeeding.
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Careful

Herring

Herring is an oily fish and may contain build ups of pollutants - don't eat more than two servings a week.
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Safe

Ikura (Salmon Roe)

Fish roe (eggs) is considered safe for consumption while pregnant, as long as it's been thoroughly cooked and/or pasteurised.
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Careful
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Safe

Jellied Eels

Jellied eels are cooked during the preparation process, but do contain high quantities of vitamin A so don't eat too many.

Safe

Jellyfish

Make sure it is well cooked.

As long as it's safe for human consumption - and cooked well - it should be fine while pregnant.
Safe
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Safe

Kazunoko (Herring Roe)

Fish roe (eggs) should be safe to eat while pregnant, as long as they have been thoroughly cooked and/or pasteurised beforehand.
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Careful

King Crab

Only if it is thoroughly cooked, melting and slightly burnt.

Only eat this if it's cooked well, as raw shellfish is unsafe to consume during pregnancy.
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Safe

Kingfish (King Mackarel)

This is not recommended for pregnant women due to the levels of mercury found in the fish's system.
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Unsafe

Lamprey

High levels of mercury have been detected in lampreys.
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Unsafe
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Unsafe

Lobster

Only if it is thoroughly cooked, melting and slightly burnt.

Cook this thoroughly before eating as raw shellfish is unsafe.
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Safe
Safe

Lox

Uncooked (and unfrozen) fish can be host to harmful bacteria.
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Unsafe

Lumpfish Roe

Fish roe (eggs) need to be thoroughly cooked and/or pasteurised before they can be considered safe.
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Careful

Lutefisk

Lutefisk contains numerous harmful chemicals. Although these are usually removed and/or reduced during the preparation and cooking process, it's best to be on the safe side if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.
Unsafe

Mackerel

Don't eat more than two portions of this oily fish per week.
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Careful

Mahi Mahi (Dorado)

Moderate levels of mercury mean you shouldn't consume more than six six-ounce portions per month.
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Careful
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Unsafe

Masago (Capelin Roe)

Make sure any fish roe (eggs) that you eat are thoroughly cooked and/or pasteurised.
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Careful
Safe

Moonfish (Opah, Cusk)

Only eat this once a fortnight to prevent a build up of mercury.
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Safe

Mussel

Only if it is thoroughly cooked, melting and slightly burnt.

Ensure mussels are cooked thoroughly as raw shellfish is unsuitable for a pregnant woman's diet.
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Safe
Safe
Safe

Oyster

Only if it is thoroughly cooked, melting and slightly burnt.

Make sure oysters are cooked well before eating - raw shellfish is unsafe during pregnancy.
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Safe
Safe

Patagonian Toothfish (Chilean Seabass)

There are moderate levels of mercury in this fish, and you should avoid if possible. It should be fine in very limited quantities.
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Careful
Safe

Periwinkle (Winkle)

Only if it is thoroughly cooked, melting and slightly burnt.

Raw shellfish is considered unsafe for pregnant women.
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Safe

Pickled Cockles

These are cooked during preparation, although usually served cold, so don't have the same cause for concern as raw shellfish.
Safe
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Safe
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Unsafe

Pilchard

Pilchards are classed as oily (and may contain chemical pollutants) and you shouldn't eat more than two portions a week if you're pregnant.
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Careful
Safe
Safe
Safe
Safe

Portuguese Dogfish (Siki)

Don't eat more than 150g a week.
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Careful

Prawn

Only if it is thoroughly cooked, melting and slightly burnt.

Pregnant women should not eat raw shellfish.
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Safe

Prawns (Shrimp)

Only if it is thoroughly cooked, melting and slightly burnt.

Be sure to cook this well before eating; raw shellfish can be harmful.
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Safe

Pufferfish (Fugu)

Incredibly difficult to prepare safely. If prepared poorly it is toxic to humans and can be lethal.
Unsafe
Safe
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Unsafe
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Careful

Sablefish (Black Cod)

There are moderate levels of mercury in this fish, and you should avoid if possible. It shouldn't be an issue in strictly limited amounts.
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Careful

Salmon

All varieties of salmon (in all preparations - i.e. smoked, canned, fresh) are considered low in mercury. However, because they are oily, pregnant women shouldn't consume more than two portions per week to avoid a build up of pollutants.
Careful

Sanddab

Do not have more than two or three times a week.
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Careful

Sardine

Due to their oily nature, sardines can contain other pollutants. Sardines are fine to consume while pregnant, but don't have more than two portions a week.
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Careful

Scallop

Only if it is thoroughly cooked, melting and slightly burnt.

Shellfish on the whole is safe, but make sure it's cooked first as raw dishes can be harmful.
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Safe

Scampi (Langoustine)

Only if it is thoroughly cooked, melting and slightly burnt.

Safe

Sea Bass

Don't have this fish more than twice a week as they can contain similar pollutants to oily fish. Infrequent consumption is perfectly fine.
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Safe

Sea Bream (Porgies)

Do not eat more than two portions a week. Studies have shown that sea bream can contain unsafe contaminants which may build up over repeated consumption.
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Careful

Sea Cucumber

Only if it is thoroughly cooked, melting and slightly burnt.

Careful
Safe
Safe

Shad Roe

Listeria can be a problem in fish roe (eggs) as they are often served raw. Make sure roe is cooked and/or pasteurised to reduce the chance of contracting it.
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Careful
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Unsafe

Shrimp Paste

Only if it is thoroughly cooked, melting and slightly burnt.

Shrimp paste can be made from air- or sun-dried fish, so make sure it is cooked before eating it (in the dishes it is most common, such as curries, it will be safe).
Safe
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Safe
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Safe
Unsafe

Snapper

Snapper may contain moderate levels of mercury. It's best avoided, but a few small portions a month should be fine.
Careful

Snow Crab

Only if it is thoroughly cooked, melting and slightly burnt.

Raw shellfish can be harmful during pregnancy.
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Safe
Safe

Sprat

Sprats are oily and should therefore only be eaten (at most) twice a week to avoid build-ups of potentially harmful contaminants.
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Safe

Sturgeon

Limit consumption to two portions per week to avoid potentially harmful levels of pollutants.
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Careful
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Safe

Sushi

Sushi is often safe to eat while pregnant, but check each ingredient to be on the safe side.
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Careful
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Unsafe
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Safe
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Safe
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Unsafe

Tobiko (Flying Fish Roe)

Fish roe (eggs) are considered safe for consumption while pregnant - but only if it has been thoroughly cooked and/or pasteurised so the chance of contracting listeria is reduced.
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Careful

Trout

This oily fish should not be consumed more than twice a week.
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Careful

Tuna (Albacore, Yellowfin, Bigeye, Skipjack, Bluefin)

Tuna can contain high levels of mercury and when it's fresh it is also considered oily. Don't eat more than two medium-sized portions of fresh tuna (or more than four cans of canned tuna) a week.
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Careful

Turbot

Don't eat more than two portions a week because it could have similar levels of pollutants as oily fish.
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Careful

Uni (Sea Urchin Roe)

Uni, or sea urchin roe, should be safe as long as it has been cooked well and/or pasteurised.
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Careful

Wahoo

No more than once every two weeks.
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Careful

Whelks

Only if it is thoroughly cooked, melting and slightly burnt.

Raw shellfish is unhealthy for pregnant women, so make sure to cook thoroughly before eating.
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Safe

Whitebait

Don't eat this oily fish more than twice a week.
Careful
Safe
Safe